Arduino types and datasheets

Description:

Arduino types and datasheet-in this article I am going to show you different types of Arduino and its datasheet


Arduino Types:

Arduino Fio:

arduino types

This Arduino type board contains an ATmega328P running at 3.3V and 8MHz. It has 14 holes that can be used (by direct welding or by welding plastic female-pin placement) as digital input/output pins (6 of which can be used as PWM output); it also has 8 holes ready to be used as analog inputs and a reset button, all within a very small size. A novelty of this plate with respect to the previous ones is that it can be electrically powered by a LiPo battery thanks to the fact that the board has a 2-pin JST type socket to be able to connect it directly there. The plate Arduino Fio can also be powered via USB connection since it has a USB mini-B connector for this. In fact, through the food received via USB, you can even recharge the LiPo battery that is connected to that moment since the board incorporates the MAX1555 charger chip from the manufacturer Maxim. However, the USB connection is not intended for programming the microcontroller, so it is necessary to connect a USB-Serial adapter (such as those already commented when we saw the Arduino Ethernet board) to the holes on the board marked as GND, AREF, 3V3, RXI, TXO and DTR, by the pin string adequate. Anyway, the most interesting novelty of this board is the possibility to place an XBee module in the socket that incorporates specific for it. “XBee” is the trade name given by the manufacturer Digi International to a family of transmitters/receivers of radiofrequency signals of low consumption and with encapsulation and size compatible with each other. So the Arduino Fio board is designed for wireless applications that are autonomous in their operation and that therefore do not require a high level of maintenance. A very common case is to connect any type of sensor to this board together with the XBee module to create a wireless network with several Fio boards that allow them to interrelate sensors with each other and with some central data-collecting computer.

Arduino FIO datasheet:

arduino FIO datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon link of arduino FIO



Arduino pro:

arduino types

This arduino type board comes in two “versions”: both contain a microcontroller Atmega328P SMD, but one works with 3.3V and 8MHz and the other works with 5V and at 16 MHz. It has 14 holes designed to function as control pins. digital input/output (6 of which can be used as PWM output), 6 holes for analog inputs, holes for mounting a connector 2.1mm power supply, one JST socket for an external LiPo battery, one switch power supply, a reset button, an ICSP connector, and the pins required for connect an adapter or USB-Serial cable and thus be able to program it (and also power it) directly via USB. This plate is intended to be installed semi-permanently in objects or exhibits. That is why it does not come with the pins mounted but you have to place in the holes the plastic female pins “by hand” (or solder the cables directly). In this way, the use of different types of configurations as needed.

arduino pro datasheet:

arduino pro datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon product link


Arduino Lilypad:

arduino types

The Arduino LilyPad type board is designed to be sewn to textile material. It also allows you to connect (through conductive wires) power sources, sensors and actuators so that they can be “carried around”, making it possible to creation of “smart” dresses and clothing. In addition, it can be washed. This plate incorporates the ATmega328V microcontroller (a low-power version of the Atmega328P), which is programmed by attaching a USB Serial adapter or cable to the board. You can find quite a few interesting plugins adapted in size and flexibility to the Arduino LilyPad, such as temperature, light and accelerometer sensors, different colors, vibration motors, buzzers, transceivers cordless, battery holders for LiPo, button or AAA batteries, breadboards, switches, buttons, specific plate variants, etc. Even sets of these add-ons in kits called “ProtoSnaps” for added convenience. On the other hand, in the official Arduino store (see appendix A) you can acquire the “Wearable Kit”, made up of a set of components (resistors, potentiometers, breadboards, conductive wire …), a pressure sensor, and actuators various (buttons, LEDs …).

arduino LILYPAD datasheet:

arduino LILYPAD datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon product link


Arduino Nano:

arduino types

The most remarkable feature of this plate is that despite its size (0.73 inches wide by 1.70 long), still offers the same number of digital and analog inputs and outputs as the Arduino UNO and the same functionality than this. The most obvious consequence of its small size is that lacks the 2.1mm power connector (although it may still be powered by an external source through the “Vin” or “5 V” pin) and incorporates a USB mini-B connector instead of USB type B connector. Another difference is that although the Arduino Nano board is still based on the ATmega328P microcontroller (in SMD format), the USB-Serial converter that carries Built-in is the FTDI FT232RL chip and not the ATmega16U2. This board is specially designed to connect to a breadboard by means of the temples that protrude from its back, thus being able to form part of a complex circuit in a relatively fixed way.

arduino nano datasheet:

arduino nano datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon product link

Arduino Mini:

This Arduino type board is very similar to the Arduino Nano board: it is based equally on the ATmega328P SMD microcontroller running at 16MHz, it has 14 pins of digital input/output (6 of which can function as PWM outputs) and 8 analog inputs. And just like the Arduino Nano board, the Arduino Mini is specially designed to be connected to a breadboard using the pins that protrude from its back, thus being able to form part of a complex circuit in a relatively fixed way. The most important difference with the Arduino Nano board is that the Arduino Mini (to save even more physical space and thus achieve a size really minimum of 0.7 inches wide by 1.3 long) does not incorporate any USB-Serial converter chip. Due to this, for its programming, it is necessary to use an external USB-Serial adapter. Specifically, it is recommended to use a specific one and official: the so-called “Mini USB”, based on the FTDI FT232RL chip, which must be placed separately in the breadboard and then establish the relevant connections between it and the Arduino Mini via cables. To know all the specific details of this configuration, and in general, to know different possible uses of this plate, I recommend consulting the official guide.


Arduino Pro Mini:

arduino types

This arduino type board is the same size as an Arduino Mini board, and a compatible pin arrangement. It comes in two “versions”: both contain a ATmega168 microcontroller but one works with 3.3 V and 8 MHz and the other works with 5 V and 16 MHz. It also incorporates a reset button and pins necessary to connect an adapter or USB-Serial cable so that it can be programmed (and also power it) directly via USB. It can also be fed electrically through an external source connected to the “Vcc” pin. This plate is intended to be installed semi-permanently in objects or exhibits. That is why it does not come with the pins mounted but you have to place in the holes the plastic female pins “by hand” (or solder cables directly). In this way, the use of different types of configurations as needed.

arduino pro mini datasheet:

arduino pro mini datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon product link

 

Arduino Leonardo:

arduino types

The great novelty of this board is that the microcontroller it incorporates is the ATmega32U4 (in SMD format), which has all the functionalities offered by the Atmega328P but also incorporates 0.5 kilobytes more of SRAM memory and Above all, it supports USB communications directly (and therefore does not need no add-on chip like the ATmega16U2 or the FTDI). Other differences with the UNO plate is that the Leonardo plate incorporates a digital female pin more than ONE to be used as PWM output (number 13) and 6 Plus extra analog inputs, which are physically located on the female pins digital markings with a dot on the outside of the plate. Another difference is that the SDA and SCL pins for I2C / TWI communication they change their location with respect to the UNO and now they are in the female-pins digital no. 2 and no. 3. On the other hand, on the Leonardo board the GPIO pins disappear SPI, so the only way to communicate this board with the outside through this protocol is directly using ICSP pins. The fact that the Leonardo board only includes a microcontroller as much to run programs such as to communicate directly via USB with the computer allows this board to be easily simulated (if programmed conveniently) be a USB keyboard or mouse connected to said computer. Technically, when the Leonardo board is connected with a USB cable to the computer, it will detect two different connection “ports”: a USB port standard ready to use Leonardo board as one more USB peripheral (typical would be a keyboard or a mouse, as we have said) and a different port, similar to the one generated when the Arduino UNO is connected, usable in the “traditional” way, to programming and communication with the board through the programming environment Arduino.



auto-reset Leonardo board:

Also because the Leonardo board uses a single microcontroller both for the execution of the programs and for the USB communication with the computer, by restarting the microcontroller (by physically pressing the “Reset” of the board or through the corresponding button of the environment of development) the USB connection similar to ONE (the other not) is interrupted and the restore. This does not happen with the UNO board because there the USB connection maintains it always a separate chip (the ATmega16U2) that is never reset. A The consequence of this fact is that whatever program is communicating in that moment through a serial connection via USB with the Leonardo board you will lose your connection. Another consequence is that the loading of the programs carried out by the bootloader will take a few seconds (usually about eight) since After restarting is enabled, the Arduino development environment should wait until it detects an active USB connection again and then perform the program load through it. If the physical reset button is used, this delay implies that we must press and hold this button during those seconds until we see the message “Uploading …” in the lower bar of the environment development: we will not be able to release it before. Technically, the “auto-reset” of the Leonardo board is activated when the computer sends a serial signal of 1200 bits / s and closes it. This means that in board startup there will be no delay in the execution of the recorded program, since that if that signal is not received, the bootloader will not run.

Arduino Leonardo  datasheet:

Arduino Leonardo datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon product link

 

Arduino Micro:

arduino types

This arduino type board offers the same functionalities as the Arduino Leonardo (it has for example the same ATmega32U4 microcontroller at 16MHz, the same 32KB of Flash memory and 2.5 KB of SRAM memory, the same bootloader, the same voltage of work –5 V–…) but with a really minimal size: 48 x 18 mm, ideal to be located on a breadboard without taking up hardly any space. Like the model Leonardo, can be programmed through a USB connection (it has a socket mini-B for this), and can also function as a simulated keyboard or mouse. The characteristics of the “auto-reset” of the Leonardo board are also applicable to the Micro. It can be powered through the USB cable or through a power source. external power connected to pins “Vin” and “GND”.

Arduino Micro datasheet:

Arduino Micro datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon product link


Arduino Due:

arduino types

This plate belongs to a totally different family from the rest of Arduino boards. It includes the SAM3X8E microcontroller, which, although manufactured also by Atmel, it is of an internal architecture very different from the AVR (Specifically, it is of the ARM Cortex-M3 type) and in addition, its records are four times larger than usual in the other boards (specifically, they are 32 bits). Its clock speed is also well above the rest of Arduino boards (Specifically, it is 84 MHz). In addition, the SAM3X8E microcontroller has much more memory (specifically 96KB of SRAM and 512KB of Flash memory) and also from a specialized circuit (called a “DMA” controller) that allows the CPU access memory in a much faster way. All this implies that with the Arduino Due board you can do more things, and faster, allowing you to run applications that perform a great deal of data processing. The sale price is also higher than the rest of the plates Arduino, logically. Other technical data of the Arduino Due are: it has 54 pins of digital input / output (12 of which can be used as PWM outputs), 12 analog inputs, 4 TTL-UART chips (i.e. four hardware serial channels independent), 2 digital-to-analog converters (new!), 2 I2C ports independent, 1 SPI port (which is only implemented on the “ICSP” pins), 1 USB type mini-B connector, 1 USB type mini-A connector, one 2.1mm socket type “jack”, a reset button and a delete button. In addition, it offers as is the “Vin”, “GND”, “5 V” and “3.3 V” pins are common. A very important aspect of this board to know is that its working voltage is 3.3 V. This means that the maximum voltage that the input pins input / output can support is that. If they are supplied with a higher voltage (such as the 5 V we are used to), the board could be damaged. However, External power supplies can be the same as those used with the Arduino UNO board, since its input voltage ranges are identical (6-20 V theoretical, 7-12 V recommended); this is because the tension is properly reduced thanks to an internal regulator. On the other hand, the intensity offered by the output pins is between 6 mA and 1 mA, and that offered by pins “3.3” and “5 V” is between 800mA. The Arduino Due maintains the shape and arrangement of the Arduino Mega board, being compatible with all shields that respect the same pin layout and that, importantly, they work at 3.3 V. On the other hand, all the input / output pins they have an internal pull-up resistance disconnected by default of 100 KΩ. The Arduino Due offers two USB connectors to separate two functionalities different. The connector closest to the power jack (mini-B) is intended to plug the board into the computer and transfer from the development environment our program to be executed by the microcontroller, and from there maintain serial communication between the computer and the board. In fact, this connector It is controlled by the same ATmega16U2 chip as the Arduino UNO board, so that their behavior is identical. The connector closest to the reset button (mini-A), on the other hand, is controlled directly by the SAM3X8E chip and is designed to use the board as one more USB peripheral (such as a keyboard or mouse, as also happens on the Leonardo plate). But also, a novelty that This last connector offers is that it also allows the board to act as a “host USB ”(just like the Mega board does). In this way, we could not only use the Due board as a keyboard or mouse, but we could connect a real keyboard or mouse, among many other devices, such as mobile phones state-of-the-art, for example. The way to program the Arduino Due board is similar to the previous boards, both in the use of the development environment and in the language itself programming: all changes are “under the surface”. Anyway, the current version of the development environment as of the book’s edition date (1.0.2) does not It still allows the use of this board, so it is necessary to download version 1.5, which at the time of this book is in beta. The download is you can do it from here. The only detail that must be taken into account is that the Flash memory of the microcontroller has to be deleted “manually” every time you want to load it in our program. This is because the bootloader of this board is hosted in a ROM-type memory separate from Flash memory, and only runs when it detects that the Flash memory is empty. Hence the existence of the button erased (marked as “Erase”) on the plate. Fortunately, if we connect this to our computer through the USB mini-B socket (the one closest to the power), this erasing process is performed automatically. In this sense, the USB communication between the board and the computer is carried out in the same way either using the Due board (via the mini-B connector) or the UNO board.

Arduino due datasheet:

arduino due datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon product link


Arduino Uno R3:

arduino types

arduino Uno datasheet:

arduino uno datasheet

Amazon purchase link:

Amazon product link

 

Disclaimer

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About the Author: Fawad

My name is Shahzada Fawad and I am a Programmer. Currently, I am running my own YouTube channel "Expertstech", and managing this Website. My Hobbies are * Watching Movies * Music * Photography * Travelling * gaming and so on...

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