ESP32

ESP32 Tutorial: Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor

Introduction:

The ESP32 is a powerful microcontroller that is widely used in Internet of Things (IoT) projects. One of the most useful tools for working with the ESP32 is the Serial Monitor. In this article, we’ll take a deep dive into the ESP32 Serial Monitor and explore how it can be used to monitor and debug your projects.




What is the Arduino Serial Monitor?

The ESP32 Serial Monitor is a tool that allows you to monitor the communication between your ESP32 microcontroller and your computer. It is a simple terminal program that runs on your computer and communicates with the ESP32 over a serial connection.

The Serial Monitor is a key tool for debugging ESP32 projects. It allows you to view the data that your ESP32 is sending and receiving in real-time, which can be extremely helpful when trying to track down bugs or understand how your project is working.

How to use the Arduino Serial Monitor for ESP32

To use the Arduino Serial Monitor for ESP32, you’ll need to connect your ESP32 to your computer over a serial connection. This can be done using a USB-to-serial converter or an FTDI cable.

Once you’ve connected your ESP32 to your computer, you can open the Serial Monitor in the Arduino IDE. To do this, select “Tools” from the menu bar and then click “Serial Monitor”.

This will open a new window that displays the data being sent and received by your ESP32.

The Serial Monitor allows you to send data to your ESP32 as well. You can do this by typing text into the text field at the bottom of the window and then clicking “Send”. This can be useful for sending commands to your ESP32 or testing the communication between your ESP32 and your computer.



Arduino Serial Monitor settings

The Serial Monitor has a number of settings that you can use to customize its behavior. These settings can be accessed by clicking the gear icon in the upper-right corner of the Arduino IDE.

Some of the most important settings include the baud rate, which determines the speed at which data is transmitted over the serial connection, and the line ending, which determines how the Serial Monitor interprets line breaks and much more options.

You can also use the Serial Monitor to send special commands to your ESP32. For example, you can send the command “AT” to your ESP32 to check if it is responding. You can also use the Serial Monitor to upload new firmware to your ESP32 or reset the ESP32.

Functions of ESP32 Serial Monitor:

Command Textbox:

Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor textbox

The Command Textbox in the ESP32 Serial Monitor is a powerful feature that allows developers to send commands to the ESP32 microcontroller board over a serial connection. The Command Textbox is a text input field located in the Arduino Serial Monitor window that enables developers to enter text-based commands that are sent to the ESP32 board when the Enter key is pressed.

The Command Textbox can be used to control the behavior of the ESP32 board in real-time, allowing developers to test different scenarios and configurations without having to modify the underlying code. For example, if a developer is working with an ESP32 board that has an LED connected to GPIO16, they could use the Command Textbox to send a command to turn the LED on or off. This can be particularly useful for testing different combinations of input and output pins, or for verifying that sensors are working correctly.

The Command Textbox is also useful for sending configuration commands to the ESP32 board. Many ESP32 boards have configuration settings that can be set using text-based commands sent over a serial connection. For example, some boards have built-in WiFi functionality that can be configured using text-based commands. By using the Command Textbox, developers can send these configuration commands directly to the ESP32 board and modify its behavior without having to write any additional code.



Send Button:

Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor send button

The Send Button in the Arduino Serial Monitor is an important feature that allows users to send data from their computer to their ESP32 board through a serial connection. The Serial Monitor is a tool used by EP32 developers to test their code and debug their projects.

When using the Serial Monitor, users can enter text or data into the command field at the top of the window. This command field is where the user can enter data that will be sent to the ESP32 board. Once the data has been entered, the user can click on the Send button to send the data to the board.

The Send button is typically located to the right of the command field in the Serial Monitor window. It is usually represented by the word “Send”. The Send button is used to initiate the transfer of data from the computer to the ESP32 board.

When the Send button is clicked, the Arduino IDE sends the data to the board through a serial connection. The board then receives the data and can process it according to the code that has been uploaded to it. This allows developers to test their code and interact with their projects in real-time.



Output Console:

Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor output console

The Output Console in the Arduino Serial Monitor is a feature that displays the data sent by the ESP32 board to the computer through a serial connection. The Serial Monitor is a tool used by ESP32 developers to test their code and debug their projects.

When the ESP32 board sends data through the serial connection, it is displayed in the Output Console of the Serial Monitor window. The Output Console is typically located below the command field in the Serial Monitor window. It is used to display the data that has been sent from the board back to the computer.

The Output Console in the Serial Monitor window can display various types of data, including text, numbers, and other types of information. The data can be sent from the board in a variety of formats, including ASCII, binary, or other custom formats.

One of the key benefits of the Output Console in the Serial Monitor is that it allows developers to view the data sent by the board in real-time. This can be especially helpful when testing code or troubleshooting problems with a project. The Output Console can help developers identify issues with their code or with their hardware setup.

Autoscroll Checkbox:

Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor autoscroll checkbox

The Autoscroll Checkbox in the Arduino Serial Monitor is a feature that allows the Serial Monitor to automatically scroll to the end of the output console when new data is received from the ESP32 board. The Serial Monitor is a tool used by ESP32 developers to test their code and debug their projects.

When the Autoscroll Checkbox is selected, the Serial Monitor will automatically scroll to the end of the output console when new data is received from the board. This ensures that the most recent data is always visible in the console, without the user having to manually scroll down to view it.

The Autoscroll Checkbox is typically located at the bottom of the Serial Monitor window. It is represented by a checkbox that is labeled “Autoscroll”. When the checkbox is selected, Autoscroll is enabled. When the checkbox is unselected, Autoscroll is disabled.

The Autoscroll feature can be especially helpful when working with projects that produce a lot of data. Without Autoscroll enabled, the output console can quickly become filled with data, making it difficult to locate the most recent information. With Autoscroll enabled, the output console will always display the most recent data, ensuring that developers have access to the information they need.




Show timestamp:

Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor show timestamp

The Show Timestamp feature in the Arduino Serial Monitor is a tool that allows developers to view the date and time that each line of data was received from the ESP32 board.

When the Show Timestamp feature is enabled, the Serial Monitor will display the date and time that each line of data was received from the ESP32 board. This can be especially helpful when working with projects that produce a lot of data, as it allows developers to quickly identify when specific events occurred.

The Show Timestamp feature is typically located at the bottom of the Serial Monitor window. It is represented by a checkbox that is labeled “Show Timestamp”. When the checkbox is selected, Show Timestamp is enabled. When the checkbox is unselected, Show Timestamp is disabled.

The timestamp displayed by the Serial Monitor is based on the system clock of the computer that is running the Arduino IDE. This means that the timestamp displayed will reflect the date and time of the computer, not the date and time of the esp32 board.



Newline:

Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor newline selection

The Newline feature in the Arduino Serial Monitor is a tool that allows developers to control how data is displayed in the output console.

In computer programming, a newline is a special character that is used to indicate the end of a line of text. Different operating systems use different characters to represent a newline, with Windows using a combination of two characters (carriage return and line feed) and Unix-based systems using only one character (line feed).

In the Arduino Serial Monitor, the Newline feature allows developers to choose which character is used to represent a newline. This can be especially important when working with projects that involve communication between the esp32 board and a computer, as different systems may use different newline characters.

The Newline feature is typically located at the bottom of the Serial Monitor window. It is represented by a dropdown menu that is labeled “Newline”. By default, the dropdown menu is set to “No line ending”, which means that no newline characters will be added to the output console. However, users can select from a range of options to customize how newline characters are displayed in the console.

For example, if a developer is working with a project that communicates with a Windows-based computer, they may want to select the “Carriage return” or “Both NL & CR” option to ensure that the newline characters are displayed correctly in the console. If a developer is working with a project that communicates with a Unix-based system, they may want to select the “Newline” option to ensure that the newline characters are displayed correctly in the console.



Baud rate:

Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor baud rate

In the Arduino IDE, the serial monitor is a useful tool for debugging and monitoring communication between the ESP32 board and a computer. One important parameter in the serial communication is the baud rate. In this context, baud rate is a measure of the rate at which data is transmitted over a serial connection.

In the context of the Arduino IDE and the serial monitor, the baud rate determines how quickly data is sent between the computer and the ESP32 board. The higher the baud rate, the faster data is transmitted. The baud rate is measured in bits per second (bps), and typical values used in the Arduino ecosystem range from 300 bps to 115200 bps.

The baud rate is an important parameter to set correctly when using the serial monitor in the Arduino IDE. If the baud rate is set too high, it can result in data loss or garbled data. If the baud rate is set too low, it can result in slow communication and a backlog of data waiting to be transmitted.

To set the baud rate in the Arduino IDE, select the appropriate value from the drop-down menu in the bottom right-hand corner of the serial monitor window. The baud rate should match the baud rate used in the Arduino sketch that is sending data to the serial monitor.

It is important to note that the baud rate used in the Arduino sketch and the baud rate used in the serial monitor must match. If they do not match, data will not be transmitted correctly and the serial monitor will display garbled data.

Clear output:

Getting Started with ESP32 Arduino Serial Monitor clear output

The Clear Output button in the Arduino Serial Monitor is a handy feature that allows users to clear the display window of any existing data. The Serial Monitor is a built-in tool in the Arduino IDE that enables users to communicate with their esp32 board via a serial connection. This feature is useful for debugging code and testing serial communication between the board and a computer.

When using the Serial Monitor, the Clear Output button can be found in the bottom right-hand corner of the Serial Monitor window. This button is represented by caption “Clear output”, and clicking on it will clear the display window of any existing data. This feature is particularly useful when debugging code that generates a lot of output or when performing multiple tests that generate a large amount of data.

The Clear Output button is also accessible using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + K. This keyboard shortcut provides a quick and easy way to clear the display window without having to move the mouse to the bottom of the Serial Monitor window.

It is essential to note that clearing the output window does not affect the Serial Monitor settings, such as the baud rate or line ending settings. These settings will remain the same even after clearing the display window.

Another important point to remember is that clearing the display window does not stop the serial communication between the esp32 board and the computer. The ESP32 board will continue to send data to the computer, but the display window will be empty until new data is received.



Example: How to send data from ESP32 to Computer System:

In this example, we will discuss how to send data from an ESP32 to a Computer system using the Arduino IDE ESP32 and Potentiometer

Step 1: Set up the ESP32

The first step in sending data from an ESP32 to a PC is to set up the board. To do this, you will need an ESP32 development board and the Arduino IDE. Connect the ESP32 board to your computer via USB and open the Arduino IDE. Make sure that the correct board and port are selected in the Tools menu.

Step2: connection diagram:

how to send data from esp32 serial monitor to computer using potentiometer

The potentiometer is connected to GPIO32 of the ESP32. A potentiometer is a three-terminal variable resistor that allows you to adjust the resistance between two of its terminals by turning a knob. In this circuit, the middle terminal of the potentiometer is connected to GPIO32, while the other two terminals are connected to 3.3V and ground, respectively.

The potentiometer acts as a voltage divider, with the resistance between the middle terminal and one of the outer terminals changing as you turn the knob. By connecting the middle terminal to GPIO32, we can read the voltage at that point using the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) of the ESP32.

Step 3: Write the code

Next, we will write the code to send data from the ESP32 to the PC. Open a new sketch in the Arduino IDE and paste the following code:

In this code, we first initialize the serial communication at a baud rate of 9600 bits per second. Then, in the loop function, we read a sensor value (in this case, from analog input 32) and store it in a variable. We then send the sensor value to the PC using the Serial.println() function. Finally, we add a delay of 1000 milliseconds to wait a moment before sending the next value.

Step 4: Upload the code

Once you have written the code, upload it to the ESP32 board using the Upload button in the Arduino IDE.

Step 5: Open the Serial Monitor

To view the data sent from the ESP32 to the PC, we will use the Serial Monitor in the Arduino IDE. Open the Serial Monitor by clicking on the magnifying glass icon in the top right-hand corner of the Arduino IDE window.

Step 6: View the data

Once the Serial Monitor is open, you should see a stream of data being sent from the ESP32 to the PC. In this example, we are sending sensor values, so you should see a series of numbers being displayed in the Serial Monitor window.




Example: How to send data from Computer System to ESP32

In this example, we will discuss how to send data from a computer system to an ESP32 using the Arduino serial monitor and turn on and off an LED based on the received data.

Step 1: Set up the ESP32

The first step in sending data from a computer system to an ESP32 is to set up the board. To do this, you will need an ESP32 development board and the Arduino IDE. Connect the ESP32 board to your computer via USB and open the Arduino IDE. Make sure that the correct board and port are selected in the Tools menu.

Step 2: connection diagram:

how to send data from computer to esp32 serial monitor

In this circuit, the LED is connected to the ESP32’s GPIO 16 pin via a current-limiting resistor. When the GPIO 16 pin is set to a high logic level, current flows through the LED, causing it to light up. The resistor is used to limit the amount of current flowing through the LED, ensuring that it operates within safe limits.

Step 3: Write the code

Next, we will write the code to receive data from the computer system on the ESP32 and turn on and off an LED based on the received data. Open a new sketch in the Arduino IDE and paste the following code:

Code explanation:

This line declares an integer variable called ledPin and sets it to 16. This is the pin number of the LED that will be controlled by the code.

This is the setup function, which runs once when the microcontroller starts up. The Serial.begin(9600) function initializes the serial communication at a baud rate of 9600 bits per second. The pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT) function sets the ledPin as an output pin.

This is the loop function, which runs continuously after the setup function. The while (Serial.available() == 0) loop waits for incoming data on the serial port. Once data is available, the Serial.parseInt() function reads the incoming data and stores it in the data variable as an integer.

The if (data == 1) statement checks if the value of data is equal to 1. If it is, the digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH) function turns on the LED. If the value of data is 0, the else if (data == 0) statement turns off the LED with the digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW) function.

Step 4: Upload the code

Once you have written the code, upload it to the ESP32 board using the Upload button in the Arduino IDE.

Step 5: Send data from the computer system

To send data from the computer system to the ESP32, we will use the Serial Monitor in the Arduino IDE. Open the Serial Monitor by clicking on the magnifying glass icon in the top right-hand corner of the Arduino IDE window. In the Serial Monitor window, type “1” in the command field and press enter to turn on the LED. Type “0” in the command field and press enter to turn off the LED.

 

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